Classroom Assessments

 

Useful classroom assessments are aligned to the academic standards.

The Minnesota Department of Education works collaboratively with teachers across the state to define the expectations for student learning in pre K–12 public schools, so all students have access to high-quality content and instruction.

Schools and districts determine how their students will master the standards by developing courses, curriculum, and instructional materials.

Student mastery of the standards is measured through classroom, school, district, and state assessments.

Statewide assessments provide some of the information a teacher might use to gain a general sense of student engagement with rigorous standards-based content in reading, mathematics, and science. However, a teacher needs more fine-grained, curricular information to differentiate instruction for individual and groups of students. Additional evidence from the classroom layer should always be considered when making decisions about curriculum and instruction.

High quality classroom assessments provide teachers with actionable data to guide instruction.

When formative assessments are embedded throughout regular instruction, it can help teachers to clarify learning intentions and identify where students are at in their learning. These types of formative assessments are short, purposeful, and can be used to differentiate instruction to guide students where they need to go next.
At the end of a unit of instruction or at the end of a term, summative evidence of student learning is usually collected. Summative classroom assessments can also be used to identify student misconceptions and scaffold future instruction, but can also be used to communicate about learning for grading purposes.    

 

 Assessment Cycle Thumbnail          

 

 

Formative Assessment Thumbnail 2

Training Modules for Writing Assessment Questions

The training modules below support educators in developing a collection of assessment questions that are useful for guiding instruction. Although the modules are designed around multiple choice question types, the same best practices can be applied for writing or improving any question to gain insight about student understanding.

It is recommended to set aside an hour of time to work through the module, taking time to pause and reflect individually or discuss with colleagues.

Writing Multiple Choice Questions – Mathematics

Length: 1 hour

After completing this module, you will gain:

  • An overview of the principles for writing multiple choice questions of varying cognitive complexity and difficulty that are reliable for a classroom reading assessment.
  • A list of best practices to use for composing multiple choice questions that assist in determining whether students are exceeding, meeting, partially meeting, or not meeting the knowledge, skills, and abilities outlined in the standards.

Posted March 2021

 

 

Launch Button

 

Writing Multiple Choice Questions – Reading

Length: 1 hour

After completing this module, you will gain:

  • An overview of the principles for writing multiple choice questions of varying cognitive complexity and difficulty that are reliable for a classroom math assessment.
  • A list of best practices to use for composing multiple choice questions that assist in determining whether students are exceeding, meeting, partially meeting, or not meeting the knowledge, skills, and abilities outlined in the standards.

Posted April 2021

 

 

Launch Button

  • Reading Checklist for Writing Multiple Choice Questions - Companion Resource
  • Adjusting the Difficulty of Reading Items - Companion Resource 2

 

Formative Assessment Resources

Formative Assessment Animated Video:

Formative Assessment Animated Video Thumbnail

Interim Assessment Resources

Interim Assessment Animated Video:

Interim Assessment Video Thumbnail

Summative Assessment Resources

Summative Assessment Animated Video:

Summative Assessment Video Thumbnail